Bearings

Bearings coverA traditional divide drawn through the history of science fiction criticism is that between the amateur and the professional; so you have the tradition of fanzine-originated criticism, as exemplified by Damon Knight and James Blish, and the academic tradition, with Darko Suvin as an equally central figure. But if we have to break things down, I wonder whether it might be as helpful, or at least not any more unhelpful, to draw a line between those who review and those who do not. Let’s be clear, this is an act of naked advocacy for the review on my part, because at its best – for a definition of which I take John Clute’s suggestion of a first response to a book that’s worth re-reading ten years later – it is the form of critical writing I enjoy most, and because such a division allows me not just to keep Knight and Blish, but to arrogate to my camp such entertaining writers as Joanna Russ and Adam Roberts. But at the same time it’s undeniable that reviews have made a significant contribution to sf criticism over the years, and to generalise wildly I tend to find that the essays and studies I enjoy most are written by those whose critical skills have at some stage been deployed to the front line. Such writers seem to be more likely to talk about the field of fantastic literature as it is, rather than as they would like it to be. As good an example of this as you’ll find anywhere is Gary K Wolfe, whose essay collection Evaporating Genres will be out later this year from Wesleyan, and whose review collection Bearings, published by the much smaller press Beccon, I have just finished.

Bearings collects review-columns published in Locus between 1997 and 2001; like the earlier Soundings (2005), it is a rewarding and not a little awe-inspiring book. It’s no mean feat to turn out up to half a dozen reviews month in, month out, and say in almost all of them something worth re-reading ten years later, particularly when many of the pieces are only a few hundred words long. Wolfe claims in his introduction that he has no real rules for reviewing except to let the book under consideration guide the terms of engagement, but he certainly has some strategies, and if over the course of several hundred thousand words these become slightly more obvious than they are on a month to month basis, they don’t become less effective. The most characteristic Wolfe reviews open with a lump of discursive contextualisation that’s always worth thinking about – indeed in some cases you feel Wolfe is on the verge of breaking out into a full-blown essay – even if there’s the occasional sense that he’s teasing the reader by making the case for a proposition that only occurred to him fifteen minutes ago. This is followed by a concise and often witty summary of the plot and/or other salient facts about the book on the table; once that’s out of the way, Wolfe tends to deftly dissect his subject into its constituent parts and consider the strengths and weaknesses of each, before offering a conclusion that weighs up how those parts work together or don’t. It’s an approach that emphasises description over evaluation, which is perhaps one reason why Wolfe probably should take his share of responsibility for the myth that Locus never publishes negative reviews. Given the volume of work he considers, limiting himself mostly to cases where there’s at least something to praise is probably a sanity-preservation measure as much as anything else, but it still carries the obvious danger that it could end up providing a rather partial view of the field. One way Wolfe gets around this is by being very good at finding something to praise. He’s mastered the art of picking out the specific aspect of a novel most worthy of admiration or simply the one that’s new, even in cases where the whole is a failure. Sometimes this is used to place a book in the context of its author’s oeuvre — Bearings includes considerations of Stephen Baxter’s “most unalloyed thriller” (Moonseed), Connie Willi’s “most courageous” book (Passage), and Distraction, which is “easily more fun than any Bruce Sterling novel to date” — but it can soften the sting of criticism. Wolfe is, as Peter Straub notes in his introduction, a deliberately open-minded reviewer, one who always starts out on the author’s side, and usually ends up there as well. “Purely as sf”, for example, Walter Mosley’s Futureland “has to be regarded as something of a blunt instrument”, but “as a book about discovering the uses of SF, it may be more clever than it first appears”.

If this can just occasionally create the impression of a cat toying with its food, in the vast majority of cases Wolfe’s critical distance from the texts he discusses is a thing to be admired. That distance carries through the book on a broader level, as well. In addition to his preference for separating out the various elements of a book (as opposed to, say, Clute’s tendency to find a single organising principle around which virtues and flaws are constellated), Wolfe shows a marked reluctance to impose narratives on the field as a whole, despite the fact that he’s probably in a better position than just about anyone else to do so, and the fact that arguably one of the pleasures of collections of reviews is gaining exactly that sense of shape. (It was certainly something I hoped for from this particular collection, which covers precisely the period during which I became a more serious sf reader.) There’s some commentary within the compass of individual reviews, but this is always tentative and often has tongue at least partly in cheek. Moreover in this book – in contrast to Soundings – Wolfe has deliberately omitted the year-end summaries he writes for Locus and almost all of reviews of the various Year’s Best anthologies. His rationale is that all these too often “strained to identify ephemeral trends of relatively little interest from the broader perspective of several years later” (10), which seems a bit of a spoilsport way to go about things, and a significant loss in the case of those anthologies, since it cuts out a lot of useful commentary on how different editors approach the task of corralling a year’s best short fiction (not to mention a lot of worthwhile commentary on the stories themselves), and leaves some columns looking distinctly anemic. This is, however, the only major cavil I have about what is an extremely useful and lucid book; above all, this showcase of the generous Wolfean method stands as an ample demonstration of the utility and scope of the short (ish) review, and could stand to be more imitated.

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8 Responses to “Bearings”

  1. Alvaro Zinos-Amaro Says:

    Interesting review. I haven’t yet got a hold of this, but look forward to reading it. I’m a little bummed to find out we get no Year-in-Review summaries, as I distinctly enjoy them.

    Your review of Wolfe’s book does occasionally create the impression of a cat toying with its food, but mostly your critical distance from the text under discussion is to be admired.

  2. Niall Says:

    As long as you didn’t feel teased.

  3. Alvaro Zinos-Amaro Says:

    That would depend, did the opening thrust of your review occur to you fifteen minutes before starting it? :-)

    Out of hundreds of reviews by Wolfe over the last few years, one of my favorite moments has to be in his discussion of a certain fantasy book, where he provided some sort of candid acknowledgement that he may be the wrong type of reader for straight/epic fantasy. Don’t have the issue in front of me, but he illustrated the point by relating the sense of being in the midst of an action sequence and hoping that if he went to get a sandwich and came back, the non-action part of the story would have resumed.

  4. Niall Says:

    I remember that! I can’t remember what book it was either, though.

  5. Reading it Right « Torque Control Says:

    [...] on Fezzes are CoolNiall on BearingsAbigail on Fezzes are CoolAlvaro Zinos-Amaro on BearingsNiall on BearingsAlvaro Zinos-Amaro on BearingsNiall on Fezzes are CoolDuncan Lawie on Fezzes [...]

  6. Black Gate » Blog Archive » Thinking about it Says:

    [...] Also, you can read one critic’s assessment (Niall Harrison) of another critic’s (Gary K. Wolfe) collection of reviews here. [...]

  7. Alvaro Zinos-Amaro Says:

    I didn’t do Wolfe justice.

    “I confess to being a bad fantasy reader. Whenever I come across a colorful name that sounds as though it could only be pronounced as part of a doo-woop lyric, I start humming, and as soon as a battle scene threatens to go on for more than three pages, I find myself fighting the urge to go fix a snack, hoping it will be over when I return. If the flap copy tells me that unbeknownst to the hero dark forces are at work, my immediate suspicion is yes, and they’re working in promotions.” (Locus, February 2009)

    One of the things I’ve realized I enjoy in Wolfe’s reviews — part of the distance from the text you identify — is the humor, the sardonic detachment at times from the Seriousness of Reading and Reviewing.


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